The Office: Season Two review

Office_Season_2As lackluster, short, and — let’s face it — nearly irrelevant as season one of The Office was, the decision to pick it up for a 22-episode second season was as surprising as it was fortuitous.  Maybe it was Steve Carrell’s charisma that convinced the network to do so, but good decision, boys!

I consider the first episode of the second season to be the “real” start to The Office.  A lot of work went into rethinking characters and getting into a comfortable groove, and the employees of Dunder Mifflin that we know and love today emerged as a true ensemble force here.  And looking over the episode list, I’m amazed at the sheer quality of hilarious stories that are packed into this season, which is why it propelled The Office into a “must watch” type of show.

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The Office: Season One review

os11There’s a sort of hipster shibboleth that you’re supposed to claim that the two-season British original of The Office was, hands-down, the best.  Say that, and you’re in with all of the cool critics.  While it was sort of funny, I never warmed to it the way that I have since latched on to the American version, which I now consider one of my most favorite TV series of all time.

I guess I won’t be invited to their snooty parties.  That’s fine with me; I’d rather be hanging out with Jim, Dwight, Michael, Pam, and the rest anyway.

I’ve seen the entire nine-season run of The Office several times through now, as it’s one of my constant “comfort foods” in my TV time.  Sometimes I even listen to episodes in the car, because by now my brain can fill in the visuals.  The delightful mix of insanely awkward moments, sincere emotion, and hilarious corporate antics have always made me feel that I’d gladly get a job at Dunder Mifflin if it was with people like these.

So let’s go through the seasons, one at a time, and see the evolution of the characters, the company, and the show.

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Community season 5 review

c51As in real life, time and change go hand-in-hand with the quirky college show Community.   During season 4, Jeff and Pierce graduated from Greendale, new showrunners came in to take over the series, and the ratings continued to plummet.  The show was in a more precarious situation than it ever had been before, but those sorts of odds never disheartened the dysfunctional study group nor its internet legion of fans.

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Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen – A Retrospective

maryI feel like there’s something most young American women around my age can relate to – when we were young, we all wanted to be one of the Olsen twins.  So here’s a quick rundown of notable Olsen shows and movies!

Full House - At 6 months old, the twins were double-cast as Michelle Tanner, sharing the role so as to comply with child labor laws. They were credited as “Mary-Kate Ashley Olsen” for the first 7 seasons. Over the show’s 8 season run, Michelle grew into a precocious troublemaker with a proclivity for shenanigans. While many fans of the show were endeared by her rascally ways, others saw her as obnoxious and were annoyed by the show shifting its main focus to her in the last few seasons.

Our First Video - As the title suggests, this straight-to-VHS movie was the twins’ first. To say more would follow would not just be an understatement, but a total disservice to the media empire the girls would eventually build. This particular video is a compilation of shenanigans in skit- and song-form, including “Brother for Sale” (the girls attempt to sell their older brother at the bargain price of 50 cents) and “Identical Twins” (a lie; they’re in fact fraternal twins.)

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Rat Race

Rat_Race_poster“Eh, they’re always pissed, Honey. They’re Nazis. It’s like it’s their job.”

The Scoop: 2001 PG-13, directed by Jerry Zucker and starring John Cleese, Rowan Atkinson, Seth Green, and Jon Lovitz

Tagline: 563 miles. 9 people. $2 million. 1001 problems!

Summary Capsule: A group of highly deranged individuals brave desert sun, cow snot, and Smashmouth concerts for $2 million.

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